People in Your Neighbourhood

from by Collapsing Opposites

/

lyrics

There’s a psycho and she’s coming to get you, yes, and I know that I just don’t get you.

Well I’ve been a police officer for seventeen years, patrolling these streets right here, trying to keep all the people safe from fear: the old people and the young people and the mothers and the fathers and the grandparents and the aunts and uncles and the families and the babies. And for the most part, I feel like I’ve done a pretty good job of serving and protecting and treating everything with respect – keeping them safe and happy. But the other day, the strangest thing happened. My boss called me in to his office and he said, “Listen up copper. Due to unanticipated budget cutbacks we’ve been forced to institute a new system around here. It’s called a quota. You’ve got to arrest at least fifteen people a week. And if you don’t, well: you don’t even want to know what’s gonna happen to you.” So I thought about for a second and I said, “Now you listen here, copper, I’ve been doing this job for a lot of years, and I know that a lot of these people we see out there aren’t really criminals. They’ve got all kinds of issues going on. They don’t need the cops. What they need is a doctor.”

There’s a doctor and they’re coming to get you, yes, and I know that she just don’t get me.
There’s a psycho and she’s out to get you, yes, and I know that he just don’t get you.

Well I’m not really such a psycho, I’ll have you know. I’m just a little misunderstood. I just do things differently than how you think I should. Like the other day, I was walking down the street and I just thought I’d do a little dance. I was completely sober, just trying to express myself through some new kind of contemporary dance. And a cop came up to me and he said, “If you were on drugs, I would understand, but nobody just walks around doing a dance. We’re going to have to take you in.” And he put me in handcuffs and shoved me in the car and took me to a jail with padding and bars and he jammed a bunch of pills down my throat and told me not to worry and said now I’m healthy and I’ll never dance that way again. Well I’ve got to tell you, I’ve got some real problems with our contemporary medical system. You can’t just kidnap someone and drug them up and deny their personality like that. If it ever happens again, this is what I’m going to do: I’m going to get myself a lawyer and I’m going to sue you.

There’s a lawyer and he’s coming to get you, yes, and I know that she just don’t get you.
There’s a doctor and she’s out to get you, yes, and I know that she just don’t get me.
There’s a psycho and he’s coming to me, yes, and I know that they just don’t get you.

Well I’ve been a family doctor for seventeen years. I’ve got a nice little practice in this quiet suburban strip mall here. And generally, things have been pretty darn good. I help all the people in my neighbourhood, like lawyers and police officers and their babies and their families – whoever needs my help, really. But I’ve got this one patient that I don’t know what to do with. They come in every week to refill their prescriptions, and of course they have to wait in the waiting room for a reasonable amount of time. But recently I started looking in there after they’ve gone. And when they leave, I look in, and every single time without fail there’s some new graffiti written all over the walls. With permanent marker, they’ve written stuff like: “I hate doctors!” “Doctors suck!” “Go home, doctors!” “Doctors? Fuck!” I’m trying to help you here! You’re just like everyone else. I don’t know why you’ve gotta go and trash the place or what you think your problem is. I don’t know what your problem is, but I don’t know if I can help a psycho like this. If it happens again, I swear I’m going to call the police.

There’s a copper and I’m coming to get me, yes, and I know that you just don’t get me.
There’s a doctor and he’s out to get you, yes, and I know that they just don’t get you.
There’s a lawyer and he’s coming to get me, yes, and I know that she just don’t get me.
There’s a psycho and she’s out to get you, yes, and I know that they just don’t get you.
There’s a copper and they’re out to get me, yes, and I know that they just don’t get me.
There’s a lawyer and they’re coming to get me, yes, and I know that you just don’t get me.
There’s a doctor and they’re coming to do you, yes, and I know that we’re out to screw you.
There’s a psycho and we’re out to get you, yes, and I know that we just don’t get you.

credits

from Real Moving, released October 8, 2011
Written by Collapsing Opposites.
Recorded by Ryan and Enzio.
Mixed by Enzio.
Mastered by Tom.
Recorded at Exchange Dublin in Dublin, Ireland in 2010
with overdubs done at the Verster household in Vancouver, Canada in 2011.
Singing by Ryan.
Guitar by Ryan and Aaron.
Keyboard by Jason.
Drums by Laura.
Bass by Jarrett.
Violin by Adrienne.
Cello by Caitlin.
Trumpet by Michelle.

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